Conforming to the majority research proposal

Saul McLeodpublishedupdated Conformity is a type of social influence involving a change in belief or behavior in order to fit in with a group.

Conforming to the majority research proposal

Types of conformity A. Publicly acting in accord with social pressure while privately disagreeing. This term best describes the behavior of a person who is motivated to gain reward or avoid punishment.

On the level of compliance, many experimenters see little difference between animals and humans, because all organisms respond to rewards and punishments.

As with compliance, we do not behave in a particular way because such behavior is intrinsically satisfying. Rather, we adopt a particular behavior because it puts us in a satisfying relationship to the person or persons with whom we are identifying.

We do come to believe in the opinions and values we adopt, though not very strongly. We want to be like some particular person.

Want to be just like your father. Both acting and believing in accord with social pressure. This is the most permanent, deeply rooted response to social influence. Internalization is motivated by a desire to be right.

If the person who provides the influence is perceived to be trustworthy and of good judgment, we accept the belief he or she advocates and we integrate it into our belief system.

Comparison of the three: Compliance is the least enduring and has the least effect on the individual, because people comply merely to gain reward or to avoid punishment. Rewards and punishments are very important means to get people to learn and to perform specific activities but are limited as techniques of social influence because they must be ever present to be effective - unless the individual discovers some additional reason for continuing the behavior.

Continuous reward or punishment is not necessary for identification. All that is needed is the individual's desire to be like that person. You will continue to hold beliefs similar to the SO as long as he remains important to you, he still holds the same beliefs, and those beliefs are not challenged by counter-opinions that are more convincing.

If the SOs beliefs change or he becomes less important to you, your beliefs can change.

"Pressure, Self-Monitoring and Conformity" by Jeremy M. Reinblatt

They can also change if people who are more important to you express different beliefs. The effect of identification can also be dissipated by a desire to be right.

Internalization is the most permanent response to social influence because your motivation to be right is a powerful and self-sustaining force that does not depend on constant surveillance as does complianceor on your continued esteem for another person or group as does identification.

In compliance, the important component is power -the power of the influencer to dole out rewards and punishments. In identification, the crucial component is attractiveness - the attractiveness of the person with whom we identify. Because we identify with the model, we want to hold the same opinions that the model holds.

In internalization, the crucial component is credibility - the credibility of the person who supplies the information 5. Any of the three can determine behavior. In the Asch studies, it seems obvious the subjects were complying with the unanimous opinion of the group in order to avoid the punishment of ridicule or rejection.

If either identification or internalization had been involved, the conforming behavior would have persisted in private NOTE: Subjects gave different answers when responses were not public. Circumstances can increase the permanence of conformity produced by compliance or identification.

While complying, we might discover something about our actions, or about the consequences of our actions, that makes it worthwhile to continue the behavior even after the original reason for compliance is no longer forthcoming.

For example, people came to obey speeding laws even after enforcement was lessened because they liked the less hectic pace. Sherif's studies of Norm formation. People looked at stationary light - and then formed a group consensus as to how far the light moved.

Illustrated power of suggestibility.Test Taking: A Research Proposal to Examine the Pressures to Conform on High and Low Self-Monitors A Research Proposal to Examine the Pressures to Conform on High and Low Self-Monitors. the majority or the minority of confederates.

Conforming to the majority research proposal

PRESSURE, SELF-MONITORING AND CONFORMITY. Most past research ignored the reaction of the majority to the presence of minority members (Tsui et al.

) and therefore, future research should pay more attention to majority reactions to . If either identification or internalization had been involved, the conforming behavior would have persisted in private (NOTE: Subjects gave different answers when responses were not public.) 6.

Circumstances can increase the permanence of conformity produced by compliance or identification. The research that we have discussed to this point involves conformity in which the opinions and behaviors of individuals become more similar to the opinions and behaviors of the majority of the people in the group—majority influence.

Conforming to the Majority Research Proposal Essay Previous Research The subject of conformity is one that has not been extensively researched over the years.

There are very few famous studies concerning conformity but of them Soloman E.

In This Section

Asch’s stands out. The causes of conformity among individuals have long been debated and researched in recent decades. The research examined for this piece fits the categories of a model proposed to explain the five main motivational reasons to conform: the desire to be correct, the desire to be socially accepted and.

Conformity and Group Mentality